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Beatrix A. Hamburg

(1923 - )

Medical Researcher, National Academy of Medicine Member

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Beatrix A. Hamburg

Beatrix A. Hamburg is a visiting scholar in the Department of Psychiatry of the Cornell University College of Medicine. She has had a long career in academic medicine. She is a former president of the William T. Grant Foundation, which supports research on the development of children, adolescents, and youth, and has served on the faculties of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Hamburg received her A.B. from Vassar College and her M.D. from the Yale University School of Medicine. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Royal Society of Medicine, and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. She has participated in many studies sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine, the National Research Council, and other organizations.

As a medical researcher, Dr. Hamburg is most noted for her studies of early adolescence, pioneering work on peer counseling, and studies of diabetic children and adolescents. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry has established an award in her name given at its annual meeting. In 2015 the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation recognized Dr. Hamburg and her husband and colleague, Dr. David. A Hamburg, with the Pardes Humanitatian Prize in Mental Health for their decades of pioneering research and many contributions to the field.

Additional Information

"Dr. Beatrix Hamburg: In Her Own Words," video by Eric Hamburg

"Making the Case for Integration," Vassar Alumnae Quarterly

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